How Aerial Kept Me Sane

I’ve started doing a silks evening course at London’s Circus Space this term. If you want to do evening classes at the Circus Space but didn’t start at their Circus Level 1, you’re required to take an assessment. I did my assessment in July, and was lucky to be offered a place as their waiting list can be very long. I was hoping to book a rope class, so when they called me to say they had a cancellation in silks I was hesitant to take the place. The student canceled her booking two weeks before the course started, so the woman who called me wouldn’t let me think it over night as they needed to confirm places as soon as possible. If I didn’t take the place she’d had to move on to the next person on the list.

“Can I at least have ten minutes to think about it?” I asked.

“OK, how about I give you twenty minutes, and I’ll call you back.”

I was taken aback by the situation because the woman was a bit pushy. But I decided to take the place since I might not have this opportunity again. There aren’t any aerial classes open to the public where I come from, so I’m trying to learn as much as I can.

The evening course is a two-hour class that takes place once a week and includes a warm-up session. The Circus Space is almost militant about asking students to arrive on time to warm-up. If you arrive late, you’re not allowed to join the class. I guess this arrive-on-time policy is implemented with the good intention to lessen the students’ chances of getting injured and minimize disruption to a class, but it makes me a bit nervous because it takes me an hour on the train to reach London and the trains are often delayed.

Inside the Circus Space

Inside the Circus Space

(Photo above from Alan Parish.)

You also have the choice of booking inclusive supportive classes that comes with the evening course such as stretching and aerial conditioning. It’s a shame that I don’t have time to go to London twice a week so I haven’t been to these.

Before I started doing the course, I thought going to London once a week would be no hassle, but now I realize I hadn’t taken into account the time it takes me to get to the train station, which is already about half an hour. I need another half an hour from London Bridge to get to the Circus Space (even though it’s only six minutes on the tube). I surprised a girl in my class when I told her I was taking the train back the same evening. “I know, it’s a bit crazy,” I said. “We’re all a bit crazy,” she sighed. Turns out she’s doing three courses at the Circus Space this term.

I’ve been doing aerial for a couple of years now, and I’m still hungry for more. My friends have been surprised at my enthusiasm and dedication. I’ve always enjoyed sports but I’m not athletic, so I think they don’t exactly associate me with holding my body weight in the air. In fact, I love being in the air to explore the possibilities of body movement that seem to defy gravity. I also love the expression of body language. Different people favour different movements and tricks, so when you see a routine you can usually infer something about the performer’s personality through his/her choice of music and choreography.

Me in an angel on rope.

Me in an angel on rope.

Training has also helped me become more self-aware about my body in general. I need to sleep and eat well in order to have a good training session. This doesn’t always happen, especially not when I wake-up at three o’clock in the morning in cold sweat worrying about my thesis, but I know where my fitness level needs to be in order to execute a routine. I’ve become stronger and for the first time in my life, I have shy abs.

Even though training leaves me sore and tired, aerial is my highlight of the week and I rarely miss a class. It has kept me sane through the multiple setbacks of the Ph.D. When I get depressed thinking about my thesis corrections, aerial gives me something to look forward to. I struggle with finding self-confidence in the stuffy academic environment these days, but last week a girl in my class (the same one doing three courses at the Circus Space this term) asked me, “You have beautiful lines, were you a gymnast?” I secretly thanked for helping me feel better about myself.

Since I’ve been training consistently, I know most of the aerialists in the city I live in. I regard myself as a friendly outsider learning about the difficulties they face balancing training and working, performing and paying the bills. The economic recession has been cutting to the arts sector, so the work of performing artists has really suffered from the lack of funding. I’ve learned that being in circus is not only about a profession, but also a lifestyle and attitude. Most aerialists I know hold a couple of part-time jobs, but they love aerial and circus so they stick with it.

I don’t know how far I’ll go with aerial, but at the moment I still get very excited when I see a move I want to learn, or put a routine together to the music I like.

I only wish I’d done it sooner.

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