Tag Archives: new year resolutions

New Year Aerial Resolutions: Work Hard, Play Hard

This has been a particularly difficult year for me. My thesis major corrections has been a big blow to my confidence, but I am grateful that I am slowly coming out of it with the help and support of good friends.

The aerial side of things has been completely different from my academic work. I feel stronger, more motivated than ever, and feel much closer to my dream of teaching aerial one day. I completed a 12-weeks Silks Level I evening course at the Circus Space this term and never missed a class. That’s a back and forth two-hours journey to London once every week. Once every week might not seem much, but when you’ve got a thesis correction schedule to chase, spending the afternoon and evening on the road feels like a sin. But I feel it has kept me sane, giving me something to look forward to and be excited about. We had a very good teacher for our silks class. She’s methodical on wraps and this has helped me become less afraid of drops.

So my new year resolutions is simple: work hard and play hard. When I work on my thesis I won’t think about my next aerial class (this is very hard considering the amount of time I get distracted doing “aerial research” on YouTube). When I train I won’t think about my thesis. Piece of cake. I need to come up with a more efficient schedule to fit the one thing that I absolutely have to pull through, and the other thing that I love.

A few of my favorite aerial things this year:

1. The curly-wurly drop:

This is my first two-rotations drop. I first learned this drop on the silks and then transferred it to the rope. I’m still bewildered every time I do it: your eyes are open all the way through the drop but you don’t see anything because one, gravity is pulling you quite quickly, and two, you’re concentrated on keeping body tension. I’m always amazed at how different a drop feels on your body compared to seeing someone doing it. I might be side tracking a bit here, but this is one of the reasons why you should NEVER, EVER try to replicate a drop from YouTube. Admittedly I tried to copy a double-knee hock drop that I saw on the internet when I was a beginner/improver. I thought, “Hey, how difficult can it be?” I was tangled up with the rope squeezing me out of air. NOT a good idea. My point is that taught safely the curly-wurly is a fun drop to do.

curly wurly!

curly wurly!

2. Becoming less afraid of split silks:

When I started learning aerial, I didn’t have a preference of apparatus, but I’d get more confused on the silks than on rope. For me silks wraps are more complicated… with two strands of fabric you have more to think and wrap yourself with than one vertical rope. I turn around and left and right are no longer the same. Darn. Slowly I steered towards the apparatus that felt more natural to me. But doing a course on silks this term has helped me become less afraid of the silks. Some split silks moments:

neck balance on a split silks sequence

part of a split silks sequence

3. Gaining better spatial awareness:

Working with split silks means that your relationship with the apparatus is slightly different. I love being able to grab a bit of fabric and lay out. The material of the fabric offers alternative ways of movement. I feel that my spatial awareness has actually improved by gaining more vocabulary on the silks. It also feels really good to be able to work on another apparatus when the rope is giving me a painful hard time.

a moment of

I’m also working on my straight-leg propeller and flare-into-catchers. They’re getting there!

So with these reflections I conclude my last post of 2013. Thank you for reading/following my blog. See you next year!

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