Tag Archives: Silks

Conditioning for a Stronger Aerial Body

My silks teacher was ill on Tuesday, so I booked in for an aerial conditioning class instead.

I’m used to conditioning at the beginning of a class when I’ve still got energy. This involves two to three sets of exercise, such as beating and sit-crunches on the trapeze bar, or pencil-pike on the silks. But this Tuesday was the first time I’ve done an hour-and-fifteen minutes class just pure conditioning. I tried going through the fifteen or so exercises on rope that were on the exercise sheet, but most of the times I couldn’t hold on for as long as required, like a single arm and toe hang for 30 secs.. Other times I could only get through one set instead of two sets of exercise. In the middle of panting, bewilderment, and staring blankly at the ropes I asked myself why I was doing this.

Turns out I wasn’t the only one with the same question. Towards the end of the class a girl said to me, “Sometimes I wonder why I do this to myself?? I could’ve stayed at home in this rainy weather…”

Well, I already bought my train ticket so I HAD to come… Basically I’d gone all the way to London for self-inflicted torture.

But of course I know why we do conditioning. We do conditioning so we can execute more cool stuff in the air, to stay in the air for longer, and to enjoy that temporary moment of freedom. It’s the feeling of being at awe with ourselves (kind of narcissistic) that makes us go back for more.

But conditioning is pretty boring. It’s repetitive and I find it more self-defeating than learning a new move because there isn’t a reward in itself, like a pretty pose or a flashy move. But as with many boring things, it’s necessary. The repetition of conditioning helps strengthen the muscles and build muscle memory, and that’s the reward on the long run. When you’re stronger, you feel more confident and it reduces the chances of injuries or panicking in the air when you end up in a funny wrap. You train the muscles when you learn new moves, but when you’re stronger it makes the process of learning new moves easier.

I'd love to rig a trapeze under the tree one day.

I’d love to rig my own trapeze under the tree one day.

(Photo Credit: Martin Thomas under Creative Commons.)

The exercise that made the biggest difference for me was beating on the trapeze. By this I mean hanging on the trapeze bar in long arms, drawing my shoulder blades down, and beating with straight legs to the bar for a couple of times. My teacher told me that I don’t need to think too much about swinging my legs forward, but concentrate on swinging back, as the momentum will bring my legs to the bar. It’s important to try to keep your body in a straight line with an open chest, knees and ankles together side by side. (Please note that this is one way of beating. I’ve heard of another one called “flat beating” which I’m not very familiar with.)

I felt very anxious and nervous the first couple of times I tried beating because I was scared of losing my grip (plus it was really hard to swing my legs to the bar!). But when I got used to it I found that it really works the muscle group under the arm near the shoulder blade. Gradually I was able to hold myself longer with more stability in the air. Now that I can enjoy swinging beating has become one of my favourite conditioning exercises.

What do you do for a stronger aerial body?