Tag Archives: Trapeze

EADF photos and video released!

The photos and video for this year’s EADF (European Aerial Dance Festival) have been released! I’ve been looking forward to these and was happy to find they’ve finally uploaded them. Browsing through the photos reminded me of what a great week it was. The weather was unusually warm even for July-August in Southeast England, so it finally felt like a proper summer. The workshop also helped dispel my post-viva trauma blues. I did the workshop with a couple of friends. We train together on a regular basis so it was great fun to do the workshop together.

The EADF is a week-long aerial workshop that takes place in Brighton, UK in the beautiful Brighton Dome every August. These classes include counter-weight, static trapeze, corde lisse, silks, and harness. I haven’t tried the counter-weight or the harness classes yet because I don’t have the equipment to practice with afterwards, but I’ve heard they’re a lot of fun.

When I did the beginners/improvers corde lisse workshop last year, I already had one year of aerial experience, but I still found it very challenging. I’d never trained for five days consecutively, so by Wednesday my muscles were incredibly sore and tight. It was the first time I dreaded doing aerial. I felt weak in the air and I was afraid I’d lose grip. Luckily my friend Michael was in the same class so he kept spotting me.

This year I decided to go for the beginner/improvers dance trapeze and intermediate/advanced corde lisse workshop. It was still very tough, but I managed to keep up. Since they scheduled the corde lisse workshop over the weekend, by the time we started the corde lisse class I’d already done five days of trapeze. I didn’t realize how tired my body was until Saturday. I know this is a piece of cake for circus students, but it’s the first time in my life that I’ve done physical training for a whole week and managed to survive. I did get injured and I had to go for a couple of sports massage sessions afterwards, but it was a huge improvement from last year so I was very proud of myself.

If you’ve been doing aerial for a while and are thinking of adding new vocabulary to your routine, learning technique from a different teacher, or wonder what it’s like to train intensely, I’d recommend trying the EADF. The teachers are patient, generous, and know how to teach.

Besides, it’s Brighton and the seaside in the summer, what can go wrong?

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Conditioning for a Stronger Aerial Body

My silks teacher was ill on Tuesday, so I booked in for an aerial conditioning class instead.

I’m used to conditioning at the beginning of a class when I’ve still got energy. This involves two to three sets of exercise, such as beating and sit-crunches on the trapeze bar, or pencil-pike on the silks. But this Tuesday was the first time I’ve done an hour-and-fifteen minutes class just pure conditioning. I tried going through the fifteen or so exercises on rope that were on the exercise sheet, but most of the times I couldn’t hold on for as long as required, like a single arm and toe hang for 30 secs.. Other times I could only get through one set instead of two sets of exercise. In the middle of panting, bewilderment, and staring blankly at the ropes I asked myself why I was doing this.

Turns out I wasn’t the only one with the same question. Towards the end of the class a girl said to me, “Sometimes I wonder why I do this to myself?? I could’ve stayed at home in this rainy weather…”

Well, I already bought my train ticket so I HAD to come… Basically I’d gone all the way to London for self-inflicted torture.

But of course I know why we do conditioning. We do conditioning so we can execute more cool stuff in the air, to stay in the air for longer, and to enjoy that temporary moment of freedom. It’s the feeling of being at awe with ourselves (kind of narcissistic) that makes us go back for more.

But conditioning is pretty boring. It’s repetitive and I find it more self-defeating than learning a new move because there isn’t a reward in itself, like a pretty pose or a flashy move. But as with many boring things, it’s necessary. The repetition of conditioning helps strengthen the muscles and build muscle memory, and that’s the reward on the long run. When you’re stronger, you feel more confident and it reduces the chances of injuries or panicking in the air when you end up in a funny wrap. You train the muscles when you learn new moves, but when you’re stronger it makes the process of learning new moves easier.

I'd love to rig a trapeze under the tree one day.

I’d love to rig my own trapeze under the tree one day.

(Photo Credit: Martin Thomas under Creative Commons.)

The exercise that made the biggest difference for me was beating on the trapeze. By this I mean hanging on the trapeze bar in long arms, drawing my shoulder blades down, and beating with straight legs to the bar for a couple of times. My teacher told me that I don’t need to think too much about swinging my legs forward, but concentrate on swinging back, as the momentum will bring my legs to the bar. It’s important to try to keep your body in a straight line with an open chest, knees and ankles together side by side. (Please note that this is one way of beating. I’ve heard of another one called “flat beating” which I’m not very familiar with.)

I felt very anxious and nervous the first couple of times I tried beating because I was scared of losing my grip (plus it was really hard to swing my legs to the bar!). But when I got used to it I found that it really works the muscle group under the arm near the shoulder blade. Gradually I was able to hold myself longer with more stability in the air. Now that I can enjoy swinging beating has become one of my favourite conditioning exercises.

What do you do for a stronger aerial body?